A STACK OF CHIMNEYS AT OXBURGH HALL, NORFOLK


Terracotta Chimneys, Oxburgh Hall, Norfolk 1The medieval core of Oxburgh Hall dates from 1482. In the Victorian era, a number of features were added, including oriel windows overlooking the moat (see above), crow- (‘flemish’) stepped gables and a number of tall terracotta chimneys, all  differently patterned. Here are some of them.

1482Oxburgh Hall Date Terracotta Chimneys, Oxburgh Hall, Norfolk 2Terracotta Chimneys, Oxburgh Hall, Norfolk 3Terracotta Chimneys, Oxburgh Hall, Norfolk 5 Terracotta Chimneys, Oxburgh Hall, Norfolk 6 Terracotta Chimneys, Oxburgh Hall, Norfolk 7 Terracotta Chimneys, Oxburgh Hall, Norfolk 8 Terracotta Chimneys, Oxburgh Hall, Norfolk 9 Terracotta Chimneys, Oxburgh Hall, Norfolk 10 Terracotta Chimneys, Oxburgh Hall, Norfolk 11 Terracotta Chimneys, Oxburgh Hall, Norfolk 12

HELSINKI BUILDINGS: NATIONAL ROMANTIC STYLE & ART DECO


Helsinki Buildings 1 Helsinki Buildings 2 Helsinki Buildings 3 Helsinki Buildings 4 Helsinki Buildings 5 Helsinki Buildings 6 Helsinki Buildings 7 Helsinki Buildings 8 Helsinki Buildings 9 Helsinki Buildings 10 Helsinki Buildings 11

WALL INSCRIPTIONS, CALENZANO ALTO, ITALY


 

Wall Inscriptions, Calenzano, Italy 2Wall Inscriptions, Calenzano, Italy 4Wall Inscriptions, Calenzano, Italy 3Wall Inscriptions, Calenzano, Italy 1

DETAILS OF A SOMERSET CHURCH WALL – ST MICHAEL’S, BLACKFORD


The walls of this church, apparently of uniform colour from a distance, are richly patterned with lichen and varied hues. All these images were taken within about 12 feet of each other, ranging from weathered Ham stone wall to lichen-capped stone face 

BEACH STONE PATTERNS, WEYMOUTH


BEACH STONE PATTERNS ON WEYMOUTH BEACH, DORSET

ROLLRIGHT STONES, OXFORDSHIRE: (1) PATTERNS


The Rollright Stones in Oxfordshire is a late-neolithic stone circle about 30 meters in diameter. The stones are heavily marked by time, and many have colourful lichen growths. Some of these lichens are thought to be 400 – 800 years old. Here are some examples of the stone patterns 

COMPTON: THE WATTS GALLERY, WATTS CHAPEL – THE ARTS & CRAFTS MOVEMENT


The newly restored Watts Gallery showcases the work of artist G. F. WATTS. There is also work by his wife MARY WATTS, though that is best seen at the Watts Chapel a short walk from the Gallery. I found material for 3 of my Themes – sundials, mazes** and (stretching the definition somewhat) ‘stone’ marks. Here are examples in the first two categories; I’ll leave the remarkable terracotta gravestones (and their lettering) for another time.

SUNDIALS AT COMPTON

The Garden Sundial

An ususual sundial, now kept inside the Gallery

‘MAZES’ [**in fact LABYRINTHS] AT COMPTON

These apparent mazes are, as Ellen has rightly pointed out in her comment, strictly-speaking labyrinths. The distinction is this:

MAZES provide multiple paths with only one “correct” one

LABYRINTHS which provide a single path to the centre. Here, you should follow the raised rather than the recessed paths to understand how the labyrinth works

A maze labyrinth on the altar front in the Watts Chapel

Terracotta Angel holding a maze labyrinth outside the Chapel, among other elaborate ornamentation

This similar Angel and maze labyrinth was on the other side of the Chapel