A RIVER RUNS THROUGH IT… A HUT ON THE FROME


Fishing Hut on the River Frome, Dorset (Keith Salvesen)

The River Frome in Dorset rises in Evershot and flows 30 miles eastwards before, like its neighbouring river the Piddle, entering Poole Harbour near Swanage. It is the most westerly of the classic English chalk streams and provides excellent fishing for trout and in the lower reaches, salmon and sea trout.

Fishing Hut on the River Frome, Dorset (Keith Salvesen)

The upper river fishings, upstream of Dorchester, are wonderful for brown trout. The beat I fish (with variable success) is a couple of miles above this hut, where the fish are as wild as the unkempt banks, wily, and hard won. I have occasionally fished the beats lower downstream, above and below this wonderful hut, where the banks are well tended, though without pretention to the manicured perfection found elsewhere. 

Fishing Hut on the River Frome, Dorset (Keith Salvesen)

The river level changes abruptly at the hut, with a water-level control and an overflow that goes directly under the hut through two entries. Inside the hut, is it slightly strange to watch and hear the water passing underneath. The hut is a simple structure, its historic beams and brickwork more or less original.

Fishing Hut Interior on the River Frome, Dorset (Keith Salvesen) Fishing Hut Interior on the River Frome, Dorset (Keith Salvesen) The pastoral setting makes this stretch of the Frome a most pleasant place to be for a day. And if it the weather becomes adverse, there’s a simple and most attractive shelter from the elements.

Fishing Hut on the River Frome, Dorset (Keith Salvesen)Fishing Hut on the River Frome, Dorset (Keith Salvesen)Fishing Hut on the River Frome, Dorset (Keith Salvesen)

 

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A FISHING HUT ON THE TEST: THE PRETTIEST EVER?


Fishing Hut, River Test Hampshire (Keith Salvesen)I quite see that fishing huts are a bit of a specialist subject. However, this may be one of the prettiest anywhere, with its little garden and benignly low-key comfort. A good place to spend a day, even for those that don’t enjoy the fishing…

Fishing Hut, River Test Hampshire (Keith Salvesen) Fishing Hut, River Test Hampshire (Keith Salvesen) Fishing Hut, River Test, Hampshire (Keith Salvesen)Fishing Hut, River Test, Hampshire (Keith Salvesen) Fishing Hut, River Test, Hampshire (Keith Salvesen)

SANDWICH SHARING: IMAGES FROM A CINQUE PORT


Sandwich is a cinque port, along with Hastings, New Romney, Hythe and Dover – we had some warm family disagreements discussions about these until someone managed to get a phone signal and look them up. The town has a large number of medieval buildings, and we enjoyed a quick look round recently when we were staying nearby.

THE FISHER GATE (1384) on the quaysideSandwich - The Fisher Gate 1384

THE BARBICAN (and toll house)Sandwich - the Barbican

THE TOLL TABLE, 1905

Although viable vehicles using an internal combustion engine had only been in existence for about 6 years (and were few and far between), steam vehicles were not uncommon. It’s surprising to learn the variety of transport methods still catered for in post-Victorian England. I’d like to have possessed a ‘wain’. And a ‘chaise’, for that matter.

Sandwich - Toll table

RIVER STOUR at the quayside, with the swing bridge road that now leads to the BarbicanSandwich - River Stour

IS THIS FOR REAL? (looking at the modern screws, I concluded not)Sandwich - 'nothing happened'

ST PETER’S CHURCH (C13 / 14), now in the care of the Churches Conservation TrustSandwich - St Peter's Church c13 : 14

MEMORIAL IN ST PETER’S CHURCH with ambiguous tributeSandwich - St Peter's - Memorial

SANDWICH WEAVERS (1500)  a home and workshop used by Dutch workers in the c16Sandwich Weavers, 1500Sandwich Weavers 1500  Sandwich Weavers 1500

THE SWING BRIDGE OVER THE STOUR

The quayside was used for army embarkations for wars with FranceSandwich - Swing Bridge over River Stour

Too good to miss (from a Kent Events website)OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA 

“COMING IN TO LAND…” AERIAL LONDON


It’s always interesting to get a new viewpoint of a city, for example London. A plane is perfect for that, except that planes bound for Heathrow are generally flying too high for anyone to do more than spot the general layout and the main landmarks. Photos are unlikely to be worth bothering with, even if your have a window seat. However, London City Airport offers more opportunity. Flying in last week, I realised it might be worth getting the iPhone out to see what I could do with it through the mist and cloud. The answer was, take rather poor pictures. Then I thought about turning them black and white. Suddenly they took on a new look, both old-fashioned and rather intriguing. I thought so anyway, so here they are. 

THE SHARDLondon aerial 1 London aerial 2 London aerial 3

TOWER BRIDGE with CITY HALL

London aerial 4

THE THAMES & DOCKLANDS

London aerial 5 London aerial 8London aerial 7

THE HSBC BUILDING (CITY MELTDOWN…)

London aerial 6

MILENNIUM DOME

London aerial 9

THAMES BARRIER

London aerial 10