SPRING IN THE CITY = BLOSSOM ON THE TREES


At last we have Spring in London. The birds are ‘twitterpated’ (©Walt Disney, Bambi – classic child-friendly euphemism). Suddenly there are things to be done in the garden, largely neglected during a long winter. The sun is out and I can tell the time on the sundial (last time I looked it said ‘November’).

Spring 2013 3DWARF WHITE CHERRY BLOSSOM
Spring 2013 4                           SPIR[A]EA                                         Spring 2013 5 Spring 2013 6

A RANDOM COWSLIP IN THE LAWNSpring 2013 7

              CAMELIA                                       Spring 2013 8

                  TULIP                                            Spring 2013 9

DAFFODIL SPECIES BORROWED (ahem) FROM THE WEST COAST OF IRELANDSpring 2013 10

FORGET-ME-NOTS (‘ground cover’  – i.e.saves weeding)               Spring 2013 11

        PINK CHERRY                          Spring 2013 12

SNAKESHEAD FRITILLARIES (my favourite)Spring 2013 13

AMELANCHIER                        Spring 2013 14

  MAGNOLIA STELLATA         Spring 2013 16

                         FORSYTHIA                                   Spring 2013 17

                 SOME MORE CHERRY FOR LUCK                                  Spring 2013 15   Spring 2013 18

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4 thoughts on “SPRING IN THE CITY = BLOSSOM ON THE TREES

      • Some years ago I planted a type of lamiastrum or lamium with yellow flowers as ground cover for the shadier parts of the garden. I did not realise at the time but it is also very popular with the bees. It has done very well so far but this year I wonder if I should try to thin it out in some places. So far it has not been invasive but I have not had to reign it in either so before trying it you should get more advice. Never plant Vinca it is too invasive, I made that mistake and I don’t think I’ll ever get rid of the stuff. My Nigella and Larkspur self-seed and fill in the gaps and can be culled very easily.

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      • Excellent – lamiastrum could well be the perfect answer. And we try to use bee-friendly plants where possible (it usually is…). Actually, letting lavender spread hits both targets too… all the best, RH

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